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The gray wolf's (Canis lupus) expressive behavior is highly advanced among canids, being more complex than that of the coyote. Here, two members of Yellowstone's Canyon pack demonstrate some very expressive behavior. These more complex forms of communication are necessitated by the wolf's group living and hunting habits.<br />
When neutral, the wolf's body language is such that the legs are not stiffened, the tail hangs down loosely, the face is smooth, the lips not tensed, and the ears pointing in no particular direction. Postural communication in wolves consists of a variety of facial expressions, and tail positions. Aggressive or self assertive wolves are characterized by their slow and deliberate movements, high body posture and raised hackles, while submissive ones carry their bodies low, sleeken their fur and lower their ears and tail. When breeding males encounter subordinate family members, they may stare at them, standing erect and still with their tails horizontal to their spine. The scent glands at the base of a wolf's tail may play a role in expressing aggression, as combative wolves will raise the base of their tails while drooping the tip, thus positioning the scent glands at the highest point.
The gray wolf's (Canis lupus) expressive behavior is highly advanced among canids, being more complex than that of the coyote. Here, two members of Yellowstone's Canyon pack demonstrate some very expressive behavior. These more complex forms of communication are necessitated by the wolf's group living and hunting habits.
When neutral, the wolf's body language is such that the legs are not stiffened, the tail hangs down loosely, the face is smooth, the lips not tensed, and the ears...
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Yellowstone - Hayden Valley, Wolf
Keywords:
  • eating
  • Female
  • fighting
  • Hayden Valley
  • Male
  • Spring
  • Wolf
  • Yellowstone NP