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The gray wolf (Canis lupus) is generally monogamous, with mated pairs usually remaining together for life, unless one of the pair dies. Upon the death of one mated wolf, pairs are quickly re-established. Since males often predominate in any given wolf population, unpaired females are a rarity. If a dispersing male wolf is unable to establish a territory or find a mate, he will mate with the daughters of already established breeding pairs from other packs. Such wolves are termed "Casanova wolves" and, unlike males from established packs, they do not form pair bonds with the females they mate with. Some wolf packs may have multiple breeding females this way, as is the case in Yellowstone National Park.
The gray wolf (Canis lupus) is generally monogamous, with mated pairs usually remaining together for life, unless one of the pair dies. Upon the death of one mated wolf, pairs are quickly re-established. Since males often predominate in any given wolf population, unpaired females are a rarity. If a dispersing male wolf is unable to establish a territory or find a mate, he will mate with the daughters of already established breeding pairs from other packs. Such wolves are termed "Casanova...
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  • Antelope Creek
  • curious
  • Female
  • resting
  • Spring
  • Wolf
  • Yellowstone NP
  • Young